Syllabus

(pdf)

Course Description

Ever since the emergence of economics as a discipline, economists have been trying to provide an answer to what causes some countries to be poor and others rich. Are economies’ fates determined by their geographical endowments? Their culture? Their institutions? Why do some countries produce so much more output than others even under similar technical circumstances? What is the effect of globalization on development? What are the historical roots of contemporary economic performance? These questions occupy an increasing part of the agenda among growth and development economists. In this course we will study some of the answers that have been proposed to these and other questions.

The objective of the course is to introduce you to the frontier of research in the area of economic growth and comparative development. Additionally, it will introduce you to some of the necessary economic, computational, and mathematical tools to read, understand, and replicate the current academic research in this area. The course will give you the opportunity to learn to present and criticize other people’s ideas through presentations, replications and referee reports. Finally, the course will give you the opportunity to work on a research question of your own in this area.


Learning Outcomes

You will learn key models in economic growth and comparative development. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the frontier research done in the area of economic growth and comparative development. You will know the main theories and empirical facts. You will learn the basic skills for research in economics. Finally, you should be able to provide and test solve models for your research.


Text

The main textbook for the course is Unified Growth Theory by Oded Galor. We will also use (working) papers and chapters from the Handbook on Economic Growth and other sources.


Software

We will learn some computational tools that are useful for research. For his purpose download and install the following software:


Course Requirements

  • Reading: Reading: ** Required, * papers to choose for presentation or reports. Reading the material before coming to class is required. This will increase your understanding of the various subjects we will cover and allow you to ask questions and participate in the discussion.

  • Attendance: Attendance is obligatory and does affect your grade directly.

  • Homework: There will be no homework

  • Disability Accommodations: Students needing academic accommodations for a disability must first be registered with Disability Accommodations & Success Strategies (DASS) to verify the disability and to establish eligibility for accommodations. Students may call 214-768-1470 or visit http://www.smu.edu/alec/dass to begin the process. Once registered, students should then schedule an appointment with the professor to make appropriate arrangements.

  • Religious Observance: Religiously observant students wishing to be absent on holidays that require missing class should notify their professors in writing at the beginning of the semester, and should discuss with them, in advance, acceptable ways of making up any work missed because of the absence. (See University Policy No. 1.9.)

  • Excused Absences for University Extracurricular Activities: Students participating in an officially sanctioned, scheduled University extracurricular activity should be given the opportunity to make up class assignments or other graded assignments missed as a result of their participation. It is the responsibility of the student to make arrangements with the instructor prior to any missed scheduled examination or other missed assignment for making up the work. (University Undergraduate Catalogue)

  • Honor Code: All work undertaken and submitted in this course is governed by the University’s honor code. If any student is unclear about the University’s honor policy – either in general or its particular application in this course – please contact your instructor immediately.

  • Exams: NO EXAMS OR QUIZZES.


Grading Criteria

Grading will be based on a research paper. Prior to this you have to present in class your proposal and make an appointment to discuss it. This will count for 50% of your final grade. Another 25% will be based on writing and discussing in class a referee report for 5 papers from the reading list. The last 25% will come from presenting 3 papers from the reading list (about 60-75 minutes each presentation).

  • Research Paper…………........……………………………………………….40%
  • Referee reports, replication notebooks, Slides/LaTeX files, Code ……….25%
  • Presentations………………………………….......……………………………25%
  • Attendance and Participation…………........…………………………………10%

Presentation-Referee Reports Tips

The referee reports and presentation should cover the following: (i) Why is the paper important (or why not)? (ii) An overview of the core contributions of the paper. (iii) What you liked or did not like about the paper. (iv) How could be improved, what other questions may be asked (v) how the paper is connected to others in the course.


Tentative Course Outline

From Stagnation to Growth: The evolution of economies from the dawn of human civilization to the modern era

  • ** Galor, O. 2011 Ch. 1 & 2
  • Galor, O., 2005, “From Stagnation to Growth: Unified Growth Theory” Handbook of Economic Growth, North-Holland
  • Mokyr J. and J. Voth, 2006, Understanding Growth in Europe, 1700-1870: Theory and Evidence”
  • Cameron, R., 1989, A Concise Economic History of the World from Paleolithic Times to the Present. Oxford University Press.
  • Mokyr, J., 1992, The Lever of Riches: Technological Creativity and Economic Progress. Oxford University Press
  • ** Diamond, Jared, 1997, Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. (Part 1)
  • Livi-Bacci, M., 1997, A Concise History of World Population, Oxford: Blackwell.

The Malthusian Epoch: Theory and Empirics

  • ** Galor, O. 2011 Ch. 3
  • Ashraf, Quamrul.and Oded Galor (2011), “Dynamics and Stagnation in the Malthusian Epoch” American Economic Review, 101(5): 2003–2041.
  • Malthus, T. R., 1978, An Essay on the Principle of Population.
  • Kremer, M., 1993, "Population Growth: 1 Million B.C. to the Present," Quarterly Journal of Economics, 108, 681-716.
  • **Persson, K.G., 2008, “The Malthus Delusion”, European Review of Economic History, 12, 165-173.

Population and Growth: Theories of the Demographic Transition

  • ** Galor, O. 2011 Ch. 4
  • ** Galor, O. and D. Weil, 1996, "The Gender Gap, Fertility and Growth", American Economic Review, 86, 374-387.
  • ** Galor, O. and D. Weil, 2000, “Population, Technology, and Growth: From the Malthusian Regime to the Demographic Transition and Beyond,” American Economic Review, 89, 806-828.
  • Becker, G.S. (1981), A Treatise on the Family, (Harvard University Press, Cambridge).
  • ** Becker, G.S. H.G. Lewis (1973), ``On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children'', Journal of Political Economy, 81: S279-S288.
  • Kalemli-Ozcan, S. (2002), ``Does the Mortality Decline Promote Economic Growth'', Journal of Economic Growth 7: 411-439.
  • Doepke, M. (2005), ``Child Mortality and Fertility Decline: Does the Barro-Becker Model Fit the Facts?'', Journal of Population Economics 17:
  • Caldwell, W. J. (1976), “Toward a Restatement of Demographic Transition Theory'', Population and Development Review, 2: 321-66.
  • Cervelatti, M and U. Sunde, 2011, “Life Expectancy and Economic Growth: The Role of the Demographic Transition”, Journal of Economic Growth, 16(2), 99-133

Unified Growth Theory: Theory and Quantitative Evaluation

  • ** Galor, O. 2011 Ch. 5
  • ** Galor, O. and D. Weil, 2000, “Population, Technology, and Growth: From the Malthusian Regime to the Demographic Transition and Beyond,” American Economic Review, 89, 806-828.
  • Galor, O. and D. Weil, 1999, “From Malthusian Stagnation to Modern Growth,” American Economic Review, 88, 150-154.
  • ** Hansen G. and E. Prescott, 2002, “Malthus to Solow”. American Economic Review, 92, 1205-1217.
  • Lagerlof, N. (2006), ``The Galor-Weil Model Revisited: A Quantitative Exercise'', Review of Economic Dynamics, 9, 116-142.
  • Desmet, K and S. Parente, 2012, “The evolution of markets and the revolution of industry: a unified theory of growth”, Journal of Economic Growth
  • Cervelatti, M and U. Sunde, 2005 “Human Capital Formation, Life Expectancy, and the Process of Development”, American Economic Review, 95(5), 1653-1672

Comparative Economic Development

Overview of the Literature

  • Ashraf Quamrul and Oded Galor "Dynamics and Stagnation in the Malthusian Epoch", American Economic Review (2011), 101(5), pp. 2003-2041
  • Cameron Rondo and Neal Larry, “A Concise Economic History of the World: From Paleolithic Times to the Present” (2002), New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Comin, Diego A., Bill Easterly, and Erick Gong. "Was the Wealth of Nations Determined in 1000 B.C.?" American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics 2, no. 3 (2010): 65-97.
  • Diamond Jared, “Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies” (1997), W.W. Norton & Company.
  • Galor Oded, "From Stagnation to Growth: Unified Growth Theory," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 171-293.
  • Mokyr, Joel. 1990 The Lever of Riches: Technological Creativity and Economic Progress, Oxford University Press 1990.
  • Nunn, Nathan and Nancy Qian, “The Columbian Exchange: a Historical Change in Food, Disease and Ideas” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 24(2), Spring 2010.
  • Nunn, Nathan and Nancy Qian, “The Impact of Potatoes on Old World Population and Urbanization” (with Nathan Nunn), Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2011.
  • Nunn, Nathan (2013): “Historical Development,” in Handbook of Economic Growth, Volume 2, ed. by P. Aghion, and S. Durlauf, vol. 2. Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
  • Putterman Louis and David Weil, "Post-1500 Population Flows and the Long Run Determinants of Economic Growth and Inequality", Quarterly Journal of Economics, 125 (4): 1627-1682, 2010.
  • Spolaore Enrico and Romain Wacziarg (2013): “How Deep Are the Roots of Economic Development?” Journal of Economic Literature, 51(2).

Geography

  • ** Gallup, J. L., J. D. Sachs and A. D. Mellinger (1998), ``Geography and Economic Development'', NBER Working Paper No. w6849.
  • ** Galor O and Ö. Özak. The Agricultural Origins of Time Preference. American Economic Review. 2016:  106(10):3064–3103.
  • Olsson, Ola & Hibbs, Douglas Jr., 2005. "Biogeography and long-run economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 909-938, May.
  • Nunn N, Puga D. Ruggedness: The Blessing of Bad Geography in Africa. Review of Economics and Statistics. 2012;94(1):20-36.
  • Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Pablo Selaya, 2011. "Eye Disease and Development," Discussion Papers 11-22, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Alberto Alesina & Paola Giuliano & Nathan Nunn, 2013. "On the Origins of Gender Roles: Women and the Plough," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(2), pages 469-530.
  • Ömer Özak, 2012. "Distance to the Technological Frontier and Economic Development," Departmental Working Papers 1201, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
  • Mitton, T. 2013, “The Wealth of Subnations: Geography, Institutions, and Within-Country Development”
  • Motamed, Mesbah J. & Florax, Raymond J.G.M. & Masters, William J., 2009. "Geography and Economic Transition: Global Spatial Analysis at the Grid Cell Level," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49589, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    • Alex Trew, 2014, Spatial Takeoff in the First Industrial Revolution
  • Gordon C. McCord & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2013. “Development, Structure, and Transformation: Some Evidence on Comparative Economic Growth”, NBER Working Paper No. 19512
  • Dao, Nguyen Thang & Dávila, Julio, 2013. "Can geography lock a society in stagnation?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 442-446.

Culture

  • **Galor O and Ö. Özak. The Agricultural Origins of Time Preference. American Economic Review. 2016:  106(10):3064–3103.
  • **Galor O., Ö. Özak and A. Sarid. Geographical Origins and Economic Consequences of Language Structures, 2016
  • ** Alberto Alesina & Paola Guliano, 2014. “Culture and Institutions”
  • **Nunn N, Alesina A, Giuliano P. On the Origins of Gender Roles: Women and the Plough. Quarterly Journal of Economics. 2013;128(2):469-530.
  • Nunn N, Wantchekon L. The Slave Trade and the Origins of Mistrust in Africa. American Economic Review. 2011;101(7):3221-3252.
  • Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2009. "Cultural Biases in Economic Exchange?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1095-1131, August.
  • Guido Tabellini, 2010. "Culture and Institutions: Economic Development in the Regions of Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(4), pages 677-716, 06.
  • Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 2013. "Long-Term Barriers to Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 19361, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Jakob Madsen & Eric Yan, 2013. "The First Great Divergence and the Evolution of Cross-Country Income Inequality during the Last Millennium: the Role of Institutions and Culture," Monash Economics Working Papers 14-13, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Becker Sascha and Ludger Woessmann, “Was Weber Wrong? A Human Capital Theory of Protestant Economic History,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2009
  • Boyd, Robert and Peter J. Richerson. 2005. The Origin and Evolution of Cultures. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapters 1, 2, 5.
  • *Botticini Maristella and Zvi Eckstein “The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70AD-1492
  • Raymond Fisman and Edward Miguel “Corruption, Norms, and Legal Enforcement: Evidence from Diplomatic Parking Tickets”, Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 115, No. 6 (December 2007), pp. 1020-1048

Institutions

  • ** Engerman, S. and K.L. Sokoloff (2000), ``Factor Endowment, Inequality, and Paths of Development Among New World Economies'', UCLA.
  • ** Acemoglu, D., S. Johnson and J.A. Robinson (2005), ``Institutions as a Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth” Handbook of Economic Growth, North-Holland.
  • ** Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
  • David Y. Albouy, 2008. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Investigation of the Settler Mortality Data," NBER Working Papers 14130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2011. "Hither Thou Shalt Come, But No Further: Reply to "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation: Comment"," NBER Working Papers 16966, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • **Olsson, Ola & Paik, Christopher, 2013. "A Western Reversal since the Neolithic? The long-run impact of early agriculture," Working Papers in Economics 552, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  • Nathan Nunn, 2012. "Culture and the Historical Process," NBER Working Papers 17869, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. Nunn N, Giuliano P. The Transmission of Democracy: From the Village to the Nation-State. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings. 2013;103(3):86-92
  • ** Daron Acemoglu & Davide Cantoni & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2011. "The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3286-3307, December.
  • Stelios Michalopoulos & Elias Papaioannou, 2013. "Pre‐Colonial Ethnic Institutions and Contemporary African Development," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(1), pages 113-152, 01.
  • Stelios Michalopoulos & Elias Papaioannou, 2012. "National Institutions and Subnational Development in Africa," NBER Working Papers 18275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Maloney, William F. & Caicedo, Felipe Valencia, 2012. "The persistence of (subnational) fortune : geography, agglomeration, and institutions in the new world," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6187, The World Bank.
  • Wolfgang Keller & Carol H. Shiue, 2013. "The Link Between Fundamentals and Proximate Factors in Development," NBER Working Papers 18808, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Oded Galor & Kaivan Munshi & Nicholas Wilson, 2013. "Inclusive Institutions and Long-Run Misallocation," Working Papers 2013-9, Brown University, Department of Economics.

Human Capital

  • Glaeser, E.L., R. La Porta, F. Lopez-de-Silanes and A. Shleifer (2004), ``Do Institutions Cause Growth?'', Journal of Economic Growth 9: 271-303.
  • ** Galor, O., Moav O. and D. Vollrath, (2009), “Land Inequality and the Emergence of Human Capital Promoting Institutions and the Great Divergence” Review of Economic Studies, 76. 143-179.
    • Galor, O., and O. Moav, 2006, “Das Human Kapital: A Theory of the Demise of the class Structure”. Review of Economic Studies, 73, 85-117.
  • Lee, Jong-Wha & Barro, Robert J, 2001. "Schooling Quality in a Cross-Section of Countries," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(272), pages 465-88, November.
    • William Easterly & Ross Levine, 2012. "The European Origins of Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 18162, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    • Edward L. Glaeser & Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2012. "Entrepreneurship and Urban Growth: An Empirical Assessment with Historical Mines," NBER Working Papers 18333, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • **Galor O. and Ö. Özak. The Agricultural Origins of Time Preference. American Economic Review. 2016:  106(10):3064–3103.
  • **Galor O., Ö. Özak and A. Sarid. Geographical Origins and Economic Consequences of Language Structures, 2016
  • Becker Sascha and Ludger Woessmann, “Was Weber Wrong? A Human Capital Theory of Protestant Economic History,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2009
  • Botticini Maristella and Zvi Eckstein "From Farmers to Merchants, Conversions, and Diaspora: Human Capital and Jewish History." Journal of the European Economic Association 5, no. 5 (September 2007).
  • Squicciarini, Mara and Nico Voigtlander, “Human Capital and Industrialization: Evidence from the Age of the Enlightenment” Quarterly Journal of Economics 2015, 130(4): 1825-1883.

Isolation, Globalization & Market Access

  • ** Galor, O. and A. Mountford, (2008), ``Trading Population for Productivity: Theory and Evidence” Review of Economic Studies, 75, 1143-1179.
  • Remi Jedwab & Alexander Moradi, 2013. "Transportation Technology and Economic Change: The Impact of Colonial Railroads on City Growth in Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-17, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    • Dave Donaldson & Richard Hornbeck, 2016. "Railroads and American Economic Growth: A “Market Access” Approach," QJE
  • **Pascali Luigi, “The Wind of Change: Maritime Technology, Trade and Economic Development”, forthcoming AER
  • **Depetris-Chauvin E. and Ö. Özak. The Origins and Long-Run Consequences of the Division of Labor, 2016
  • **Ömer Özak, 2012. "Distance to the Technological Frontier and Economic Development," Departmental Working Papers 1201, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
    • Faber, Benjamin, “Trade Integration, Market Size, and Industrialization: Evidence from China's National Trunk Highway System” Review of Economic Studies 2014
    • Davis, Donald and David Weinstein. 2002. “Bones, Bombs, and Break Points: The Geography of Economic Activity,” American Economic Review, 92 (5): 1269-1289.
  • Bleakley, Hoyt and Jeffrey Lin. 2012. “Portage: Path Dependence and Increasing Returns in U.S. History,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 127 (2): 587-644.

Diversity

  • ** Alesina, Alberto, et al, 2003. " Fractionalization," Journal of Economic Growth, 8(2), 155-94.
  • ** Michalopoulos, S., 2012. "The Origins of Ethnolinguistic Diversity," American Economic Review, 102(4), 1508-39.
  • ** Ashraf, Q. and O. Galor (2013), “The Out of Africa Hypothesis, Genetic Diversity and Comparative Economic Development,” American Economic Review 103, 1-46.
  • **Depetris-Chauvin E. and Ö. Özak. The Origins and Long-Run Consequences of the Division of Labor, 2016
  • Ashraf, Q., and O. Galor (2013), “Genetic Diversity and the Origins of Ethnic Fragmentation” American Economic Review P&P,103, 1-46, 528-533.
  • Desmet, Klaus & Ortuño-Ortín, Ignacio & Wacziarg, Romain, 2012. "The political economy of linguistic cleavages," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 322-338.
  • Alberto Alesina & Johann Harnoss & Hillel Rapoport, 2013. "Birthplace Diversity and Economic Prosperity," NBER Working Papers 18699, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Ahlerup, Pelle, and Ola Olsson. “The Roots of Ethnic Diversity.” Journal of Economic Growth, June 2012, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 71-102
  • Alesina, Alberto, Stelios Michalopoulos and Elias Papaioannou “Ethnic Inequality”, Journal of Political Economy
  • Bazzi, Samuel, Arya Gaduh, Alex Rothenberg, and Maisy Wong, 2015 “Skill Transferability, Migration, and Development: Evidence from Population Resettlement in Indonesia”, American Economic Review. 2016:
  • Desmet, Klaus Ignacio Ortuno-Ortin and Romain Wacziarg. (February 2015). "Culture, Ethnicity and Diversity." NBER w20989
  • Cook, C.J. (forthcoming). The natural selection of infectious disease resistance and its effect on contemporary health.  Review of Economics and Statistics.

Persistence

  • **Galor O and Ö. Özak. The Agricultural Origins of Time Preference. American Economic Review. 2016:  106(10):3064–3103.
  • **Galor O., Ö. Özak and A. Sarid. Geographical Origins and Economic Consequences of Language Structures, 2016
  • **Depetris-Chauvin E. and Ö. Özak. The Origins and Long-Run Consequences of the Division of Labor, 2016
    • Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2013. "Long-term Persistence," EIEF Working Papers Series 1323, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Sep 2013.
  • ** Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 2012. "How Deep Are the Roots of Economic Development?," NBER Working Papers 18130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 2013. "Long-Term Barriers to Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 19361, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    • Ideen A. Riahi, 2013, “Colonization and Genetics of Comparative Development”
  • Diego Comin & William Easterly & Erick Gong, 2006. "Was the Wealth of Nations Determined in 1000 B.C.?," NBER Working Papers 12657, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • William Tompson and Kentaro Sakuwa, 2013, “Was Wealth Really Determined in 8000 BCE, 1000 BCE, 0 CE, or even 1500CE?”
  • *Broadberry, Stephen, 2013. "Accounting for the great divergence," Economic History Working Papers 54573, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  • Voigtlander Nico and Hans-Joachim Voth, "Persecution Perpetuated: Medieval Origins of Anti-Semitic Violence in Nazi Germany," Quarterly Journal of Economics 2012, 127(3): 1339-1392.
  • Cook, C.J. (2014). The role of lactase persistence in precolonial development.  Journal of Economic Growth, 19, pp. 369-406

The Neolithic Revolution

Origins
  • Ashraf Quamrul and Michalopoulos Stelios (2015), “Climatic Fluctuations and the Diffusion of Agriculture”, Review of Economics and Statistics, July 2015, 97(3): 589-609.
  • Diamond Jared, “Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies”, (2014), W.W. Norton & Company.
  • Hibbs, Douglas and Ola Olsson “Geography, Biogeography and Why Some Countries Are Rich and Others Poor”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States. (PNAS), vol. 101, No. 10, 2004, 3715-3740
  • *Matranga Andrea, “Climate-driven Technical Change: Seasonality and the Invention of Agriculture”, UPF Working Paper 2014.
Consequences
  • Ashraf Quamrul and Oded Galor "Dynamics and Stagnation in the Malthusian Epoch", American Economic Review (2011), 101(5), pp. 2003-2041
  • Stelios Michalopoulos, Louis Putterman and David Weil, 2016 “The Influence of Ancestral Working Lifeways on Individual Economic Outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa”, NBER w21907
  • Putterman, Louis. 2008. "Agriculture, Diffusion, and Development: Ripple Effects of the Neolithic Revolution." Economica, 75(300): 729-748
  • Franck, R., Galor O., and Ö. Özak “The Neolithic and Life Expectancy: A Double-Edged Sword”

State Formation and State Capacity

  • **Acemoglu Daron, Simon Johnson and Jim Robinson (2001): “The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation,” American Economic Review, 91(5),
  • **Acemoglu Daron, Simon Johnson and Jim Robinson (2002): “Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, 107(4), 1231—1294.
  • Alesina, Alberto and Enrico Spolaore, "On the Number and Size of Nations", Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 90(5), pages 1276-1296, November 1997
  • *Besley, Timothy and Thorsten Persson "State Capacity, Conflict and Development", Econometrica, Volume 78, Issue 1, pages 1–34, January 2010
  • Mayshar Yoram, Omer Moav and Zvika Neeman, Luigi Pascali, 2013. ”Cereals Apropriability, and Hierarchy,” CEPR No. 10742
  • Fleck, Robert and Andrew Hansen “The Origins of Democracy: A Model with Application Ancient Greece”, Journal of Law and Economics vol. XLIX, 115-146, 2006.
  • Lowes S, Nunn N, Robinson JA, Weigel J. The Evolution of Culture and Institutions: Evidence from the Kuba Kingdom. 2015, Working Paper.
  • Tilly, Charles. 1985. "War Making and State Making as Organized Crime," in Bringing the State Back eds. Peter Evans, Dietrich Rueschemeyer, and Theda Skocpol. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Campante, Filipe R., and Quoc-Anh Do. 2014. "Isolated Capital Cities, Accountability, and Corruption: Evidence from US States." American Economic Review, 104(8): 2456-81.
  • ** Michalopoulos Stelios and Elias Papaioannou, (2014) “National Institutions and Subnational Development in Africa”, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2014, 129 (1): 151-213

Other Topics

  • Peter Lorentzen & John McMillan & Romain Wacziarg, 2008. "Death and development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 81-124, June.
  • Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson, 2007. "Disease and Development: The Effect of Life Expectancy on Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(6), pages 925-985, December.

The dates and information provided in this document are for information and planning purposes only. The dates are subject to change based on the material covered and unexpected circumstances that require changing the schedule.